Parents
Parents - What can Girl Scouting do for her?

What can your daughter do as a Girl Scout? Check out the interactive maps on our
Girl Scouting Levels page, outlining the excitement and learning she can experience with Girl Scouts!

For commonly asked questions from parents, see the Q&A section below!

Why should she become a Girl Scout?

Learn more about the Girl Scout Leadership Experience

Change it up - What Girls Say about Leadership (powerpoint presentation)

Change it up - a report from GSUSA

Find out more at our Parent Information Nights!

Tips to help your daughter become a leader!

Q&A for Parents

Girls have many choices in today's world, and because your daughter has chosen Girl Scouts, we want her experience to be the best it can be. We have found that parents who are well informed about our organization help to make that happen.

Please review the following information and if you have any questions or concerns, contact your daughter's leader or the Girl Scouts of Maine Service Center.

What does Girl Scouts cost and how is it funded?

What can I expect as a parent?
What is expected of me as a parent?
Who leads my daughter's troop?
Is my daughter safe in Girl Scouts?
What forms will I be required to fill out?
Where can I get all the cool Girl Scout stuff?
How is the Girl Scout council structured?

What does Girl Scouts cost and how is it funded?

The Cost
- All members pay a $15 national registration fee to join Girl Scouting, all of which is sent to Girl Scouts of the USA. These dues help cover the cost of insurance, producing materials, as well as GSUSA's general operating expenses. Girl Scouts of Maine does not receive any portion of the $15 fee.

Troop dues - Troop dues help cover the cost of troop activities. Dues vary by troop; check with your daughter’s leader to find out the amount of her dues.

Cookies
- Our famous cookie activity program is the primary source of funding, as it is for most councils. All proceeds remain here in our council to benefit local girls, and a portion of the proceeds go directly to the troops to fund their activities. Our goal is to reduce dependency on the cookie sale and increase our adult-generated funding.

Individual and corporate support - A volunteer fund development committee and the council's development director work to secure donations from individuals and corporations.

Fundraising events - The council hosts several events throughout the year in various locations to raise funds.

United Way - Girl Scouts of Maine receives donations to its annual operating budget from several United Ways.

Family Partnership
- Family Partnership is designed to give parents the opportunity to help cover the costs of delivering the Girl Scout program to their daughters. With the financial support of parents and community members the council can provide quality programming and leadership to today’s girls.

Planned Giving
- The council can help donors designate Girl Scouts as part of their estates.

Back to top

What can I expect as a parent?

Programming
- Girl Scouts of Maine designs programs and materials based on the four goals of Girl Scouting: To help your daughter (1) develop to her full potential, (2) develop sound values for decision- making, (3) work with and relate to others, and (4) contribute to society. Your daughter will be offered many outstanding events and programs, and will have the opportunity to attend summer camps.

Communication
- In order to assure that parents are kept informed and up-to-date, you can expect to receive important information about your daughter’s activities. You will be informed of council news through our Girl Scouts of Maine Newsletter which is sent out in the fall and spring.


Back to top
What is expected of me as a parent?

Take an active role
- As a Girl Scout parent you will want to take an active role in your daughter’s Girl Scout experience. You can help with refreshments or transportation, make phone calls, or assist with troop meetings. Ask your daughter’s leaders how you can best assist the troop!

Support activities
- Along with troop activities, your active role can include supporting product sales. As a parent you can show your support for your daughter and the council by learning about the sale and following all guidelines and procedures.

Respect leader’s time
- Girl Scouts would not be what it is if it were not for the dedicated volunteers. However, your daughter’s troop leader cannot be responsible for girls beyond the time of the actual Girl Scout activity. Please respect the leader’s time by having a responsible person drop your daughter off at the appropriate time and pick her up immediately after the activity.

Back to top

Who leads my daughter's troop?

Trained volunteer leaders
- Girl Scout leaders are volunteers who give of their time so girls can have a quality experience in Girl Scouts. Without the many wonderful female and male volunteers the program would not be available to the girls. You can be assured that qualified, responsible people are leading your daughter’s troop.

Becoming a volunteer
- Individuals wanting to become a Girl Scout volunteer must submit an application and four personal references. Criminal background checks are performed at random for leaders. The applications, background checks and references are thoroughly checked before a person is permitted to work with Girl Scouts.

Back to top

Is my daughter safe in Girl Scouts?

Safety-Wise
- The safety of the girls is our primary concern. Girl Scouts of Maine is guided by security and safety standards documented in a manual titled Safety-Wise. Leaders review this guide in their training and strictly follow the procedures.

Insurance - All registered Girl Scouts receive basic accident insurance coverage for Girl Scout activities through national membership dues. This insurance covers up to $100 in medical expenses regardless of other coverage. Additional expenses are only covered if personal family insurance does not cover them.

Back to top

What forms will I be required to fill out?

Membership Registration - Gives girl permission to be a member of Girl Scouts of the USA. This form also collects race and ethnicity data to help Girl Scouts of the USA track how well we are serving all populations.

Health History
- Provides accurate and current health information about your daughter.

Permission Slip
- Required for all activities that are not held at the regular troop meeting time or site.

Back to top


Where can I get all the cool Girl Scout stuff?

Uniforms - Although no girl is required to wear a uniform, the council shops in Bangor and South Portland and online offer numerous uniform pieces for all age levels and adults. Your daughter is encouraged to wear something that shows her pride and identifies her as a Girl Scout.

Other items - Check out the catalog or shop for other items with the Girl Scout insignia We carry everything from water bottles, to hair scrunchies, to mess kits. You can call in, fax or e-mail your order as well as visiting our online shop.

Back to top

How is the Girl Scout council structured?

Girl Scouts of the USA
- Girl Scouts of Maine is one of more than 300 councils in the country chartered by the national organization, Girl Scouts of the USA. Each council operates as a totally separate entity, responsible for its own activities and obtaining its own funding.

Girl Scouts of Maine - Within the council there is a volunteer board of directors, a small number of paid staff and about 3,500 registered volunteers. The council is divided into neighborhoods and within each neighborhood are the local troops. Decisions are made through the democratic process. Delegates from each area vote at the annual meeting in the spring.

Channels of communication - As parents, you are welcome to communicate with any council person at any time. However, standard channels of communication would be to contact your daughter’s troop leader first, then, if necessary, you or the leader can go to the Service Unit manager. The Service Unit manager, in turn, communicates with the council staff through Membership Managers (MMs) assigned to specific areas. MMs are accountable to the Directors of Membership who are accountable to the Senior Director of Volunteer Services, who reports to the CEO, who is accountable to the board of directors.

Back to top